6. Time Series

Dynare provides a Matlab/Octave class for handling time series data, which is based on a class for handling dates. Dynare also provides a new type for dates, so that the basic user does not have to worry about class and methods for dates. Below, you will first find the class and methods used for creating and dealing with dates and then the class used for using time series.

6.1. Dates

6.1.1. Dates in a mod file

Dynare understands dates in a mod file. Users can declare annual, quarterly, monthly or weekly dates using the following syntax:

1990Y
1990Q3
1990M11
1990W49

Behind the scene, Dynare’s preprocessor translates these expressions into instantiations of the Matlab/Octave’s class dates described below. Basic operations can be performed on dates:

plus binary operator (+)

An integer scalar, interpreted as a number of periods, can be added to a date. For instance, if a = 1950Q1 then b = 1951Q2 and b = a + 5 are identical.

plus unary operator (+)

Increments a date by one period. +1950Q1 is identical to 1950Q2, ++++1950Q1 is identical to 1951Q1.

minus binary operator (-)

Has two functions: difference and subtraction. If the second argument is a date, calculates the difference between the first date and the secmond date (e.g. 1951Q2-1950Q1 is equal to 5). If the second argument is an integer X, subtracts X periods from the date (e.g. 1951Q2-2 is equal to 1950Q4).

minus unary operator (-)

Subtracts one period to a date. -1950Q1 is identical to 1949Q4. The unary minus operator is the reciprocal of the unary plus operator, +-1950Q1 is identical to 1950Q1.

colon operator (:)

Can be used to create a range of dates. For instance, r = 1950Q1:1951Q1 creates a dates object with five elements: 1950Q1, 1950Q2, 1950Q3, 1950Q4 and 1951Q1. By default the increment between each element is one period. This default can be changed using, for instance, the following instruction: 1950Q1:2:1951Q1 which will instantiate a dates object with three elements: 1950Q1, 1950Q3 and 1951Q1.

horzcat operator ([,])

Concatenates dates objects without removing repetitions. For instance [1950Q1, 1950Q2] is a a dates object with two elements (1950Q1 and 1950Q2).

vertcat operator ([;])

Same as horzcat operator.

eq operator (equal, ==)

Tests if two dates objects are equal. +1950Q1==1950Q2 returns 1, 1950Q1==1950Q2 returns 0. If the compared objects have both n>1 elements, the eq operator returns a column vector, n by 1, of zeros and ones.

ne operator (not equal, ~=)

Tests if two dates objects are not equal. +1950Q1~= returns 0 while 1950Q1~=1950Q2 returns 1. If the compared objects both have n>1 elements, the ne operator returns an n by 1 column vector of zeros and ones.

lt operator (less than, <)

Tests if a dates object preceeds another dates object. For instance, 1950Q1<1950Q3 returns 1. If the compared objects have both n>1 elements, the lt operator returns a column vector, n by 1, of zeros and ones.

gt operator (greater than, >)

Tests if a dates object follows another dates object. For instance, 1950Q1>1950Q3 returns 0. If the compared objects have both n>1 elements, the gt operator returns a column vector, n by 1, of zeros and ones.

le operator (less or equal, <=)

Tests if a dates object preceeds another dates object or is equal to this object. For instance, 1950Q1<=1950Q3 returns 1. If the compared objects have both n>1 elements, the le operator returns a column vector, n by 1, of zeros and ones.

ge operator (greater or equal, >=)

Tests if a dates object follows another dates object or is equal to this object. For instance, 1950Q1>=1950Q3 returns 0. If the compared objects have both n>1 elements, the ge operator returns a column vector, n by 1, of zeros and ones.

One can select an element, or some elements, in a dates object as he would extract some elements from a vector in Matlab/Octave. Let a = 1950Q1:1951Q1 be a dates object, then a(1)==1950Q1 returns 1, a(end)==1951Q1 returns 1 and a(end-1:end) selects the two last elements of a (by instantiating the dates object [1950Q4, 1951Q1]).

Remark Dynare substitutes any occurrence of dates in the .mod file into an instantiation of the dates class regardless of the context. For instance, d = 1950Q1 will be translated as d = dates('1950Q1');. This automatic substitution can lead to a crash if a date is defined in a string. Typically, if the user wants to display a date:

disp('Initial period is 1950Q1');

Dynare will translate this as:

disp('Initial period is dates('1950Q1')');

which will lead to a crash because this expression is illegal in Matlab. For this situation, Dynare provides the $ escape parameter. The following expression:

disp('Initial period is $1950Q1');

will be translated as:

disp('Initial period is 1950Q1');

in the generated MATLAB script.

6.1.2. The dates class

Dynare class: dates
Members:
  • freq (int) – equal to 1, 4, 12 or 52 (resp. for annual, quarterly, monthly or weekly dates).
  • ndat (int) – the number of declared dates in the object.
  • time (int) – a ndat*2 array, the years are stored in the first column, the subperiods (1 for annual dates, 1-4 for quarterly dates, 1-12 for monthly dates and 1-52 for weekly dates) are stored in the second column.

Each member is private, one can display the content of a member but cannot change its value directly. Note that it is not possible to mix frequencies in a dates object: all the elements must have common frequency.

The dates class has the following constructors:

Constructor: dates()
Constructor: dates(FREQ)


Returns an empty dates object with a given frequency (if the constructor is called with one input argument). FREQ is a character equal to ’Y’ or ’A’ for annual dates, ’Q’ for quarterly dates, ’M’ for monthly dates or ’W’ for weekly dates. Note that FREQ is not case sensitive, so that, for instance, ’q’ is also allowed for quarterly dates. The frequency can also be set with an integer scalar equal to 1 (annual), 4 (quarterly), 12 (monthly) or 52 (weekly). The instantiation of empty objects can be used to rename the dates class. For instance, if one only works with quarterly dates, object qq can be created as:

qq = dates('Q')

and a dates object holding the date 2009Q2:

d0 = qq(2009,2);

which is much simpler if dates objects have to be defined programmatically.

Constructor: dates(STRING)
Constructor: dates(STRING, STRING, ...)


Returns a dates object that represents a date as given by the string STRING. This string has to be interpretable as a date (only strings of the following forms are admitted: '1990Y', '1990A', '1990Q1', '1990M2', '1990W5'), the routine isdate can be used to test if a string is interpretable as a date. If more than one argument is provided, they should all be dates represented as strings, the resulting dates object contains as many elements as arguments to the constructor.

Constructor: dates(DATES)
Constructor: dates(DATES, DATES, ...)


Returns a copy of the dates object DATES passed as input arguments. If more than one argument is provided, they should all be dates objects. The number of elements in the instantiated dates object is equal to the sum of the elements in the dates passed as arguments to the constructor.

Constructor: dates(FREQ, YEAR, SUBPERIOD)


where FREQ is a single character (’Y’, ’A’, ’Q’, ’M’, ’W’) or integer (1, 4, 12 or 52) specifying the frequency, YEAR and SUBPERIOD are n*1 vectors of integers. Returns a dates object with n elements. If FREQ is equal to 'Y', 'A' or 1, the third argument is not needed (because SUBPERIOD is necessarily a vector of ones in this case).

Example

do1 = dates('1950Q1');
do2 = dates('1950Q2','1950Q3');
do3 = dates(do1,do2);
do4 = dates('Q',1950, 1);

A list of the available methods, by alphabetical order, is given below. Note that the Matlab/Octave classes do not allow in place modifications: when a method is applied to an object a new object is instantiated. For instance, to apply the method multiplybytwo to an object X we write:

Y = X.multiplybytwo()

or equivalently:

Y = multiplybytwo(X)

the object X is left unchanged, and the object Y is a modified copy of X.

Method: C = append(A, B)


Appends dates object B, or a string that can be interpreted as a date, to the dates object A. If B is a dates object it is assumed that it has no more than one element.

Example

>> D = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> d = dates('1950Q3');
>> E = D.append(d);
>> F = D.append('1950Q3')
>> isequal(E,F)

ans =

     1
>> F
F = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q2, 1950Q3>
Method: C = colon(A, B)
Method: C = colon(A, i, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave colon (:) operator. A and B are dates objects. The optional increment i is a scalar integer (default value is i=1). This method returns a dates object and can be used to create ranges of dates.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1');
>> B = dates('1951Q2');
>> C = A:B
C = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q2, 1950Q3, 1950Q4, 1951Q1>
>> D = A:2:B
D = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q3, 1951Q1>
Method: B = double(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave double function. A is a dates object. The method returns a floating point representation of a dates object, the integer and fractional parts respectively corresponding to the year and the subperiod. The fractional part is the subperiod number minus one divided by the frequency (1, 4, 12 or 52).

Example:

>> a = dates('1950Q1'):dates('1950Q4');
>> a.double()

ans =

     1950.00
     1950.25
     1950.50
     1950.75
Method: C = eq(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave eq (equal, ==) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n). The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the dates A(i) and B(i) are the same.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A==B

ans =

     1
     0
Method: C = ge(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave ge (greater or equal, >=) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n). The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the date A(i) is posterior or equal to the date B(i).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A>=B

ans =

     1
     1
Method: C = gt(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave gt (greater than, >) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n). The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the date A(i) is posterior to the date B(i).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A>B

ans =

     0
     1
Method: D = horzcat(A, B, C, ...)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave horzcat operator. All the input arguments must be dates objects. The returned argument is a dates object gathering all the dates given in the input arguments (repetitions are not removed).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1');
>> B = dates('1950Q2');
>> C = [A, B];
>> C
C = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q2>
Method: C = intersect(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave intersect function. All the input arguments must be dates objects. The returned argument is a dates object gathering all the common dates given in the input arguments. If A and B are disjoint dates objects, the function returns an empty dates object. Returned dates in dates object C are sorted by increasing order.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1'):dates('1951Q4');
>> B = dates('1951Q1'):dates('1951Q4');
>> C = intersect(A, B);
>> C
C = <dates: 1951Q1, 1951Q2, 1951Q3, 1951Q4>
Method: C = setdiff(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave setdiff function. All the input arguments must be dates objects. The returned argument is a dates object all dates present in A but not in B. If A and B are disjoint dates objects, the function returns A. Returned dates in dates object C are sorted by increasing order.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1'):dates('1969Q4') ;
>> B = dates('1960Q1'):dates('1969Q4') ;
>> C = dates('1970Q1'):dates('1979Q4') ;
>> d1 = setdiff(d1,d2);
>> d2 = setdiff(d1,d3);
d1 = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q2,  ..., 1959Q3, 1959Q4>
d2 = <dates: 1950Q1, 1950Q2,  ..., 1969Q3, 1969Q4>
Method: B = isempty(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave isempty function for dates objects``.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1'):dates('1951Q4');
>> A.isempty()

ans =

     0
Method: C = isequal(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave isequal function for dates objects.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1'):dates('1951Q4');
>> isequal(A,A)

ans =

     1
Method: C = le(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave le (less or equal, <=) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n). The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the date A(i) is not posterior to the date B(i).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A<=B

ans =

     1
     0
Method: B = length(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave length function. Returns the number of dates in dates object A (B is a scalar integer).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> A.length()

ans =

     2
Method: C = lt(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave lt (less than, <) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n). The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the date A(i) preceeds the date B(i).

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A<B

ans =

     0
     0
Method: D = max(A, B, C, ...)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave max function. All input arguments must be dates objects. The function returns a single element dates object containing the greatest date.

Example

>> A = {dates('1950Q2'), dates('1953Q4','1876Q2'), dates('1794Q3')};
>> max(A{:})
ans = <dates: 1953Q4>
Method: D = min(A, B, C, ...)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave min function. All input arguments must be dates objects. The function returns a single element dates object containing the smallest date.

Example

>> A = {dates('1950Q2'), dates('1953Q4','1876Q2'), dates('1794Q3')};
>> min(A{:})
ans = <dates: 1794Q3>
Method: C = minus(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave minus operator (-). If both input arguments are dates objects, then number of periods between A and B is returned (so that A+C=B). If B is a vector of integers, the minus operator shifts the dates object by B periods backward.

Example

>> d1 = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2','1960Q1');
>> d2 = dates('1950Q3','1950Q4','1960Q1');
>> ee = d2-d1

ee =

     2
     2
     0

>> d1-(-ee)
ans = <dates: 1950Q3, 1950Q4, 1960Q1>
Method: C = ne(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave ne (not equal, ~=) operator. dates objects A and B must have the same number of elements (say, n) or one of the inputs must be a single element dates object. The returned argument is a n by 1 vector of zeros and ones. The i-th element of C is equal to 1 if and only if the dates A(i) and B(i) are different.

Example

>> A = dates('1950Q1','1951Q2');
>> B = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> A~=B

ans =

     0
     1
Method: C = plus(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave plus operator (+). If both input arguments are dates objects, then the method combines A and B without removing repetitions. If B is a vector of integers, the plus operator shifts the dates object by B periods forward.

Example:
>> d1 = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2')+dates('1960Q1');
>> d2 = (dates('1950Q1','1950Q2')+2)+dates('1960Q1');
>> ee = d2-d1;

ee =

     2
     2
     0

>> d1+ee
ans = <dates: 1950Q3, 1950Q4, 1960Q1>
Method: C = pop(A)
Method: C = pop(A,B)


Pop method for dates class. If only one input is provided, the method removes the last element of a dates object. If a second input argument is provided, a scalar integer between 1 and A.length(), the method removes element number B from dates object A.

Example

>> d1 = dates('1950Q1','1950Q2');
>> d1.pop()
ans = <dates: 1950Q1>

>> d1.pop(1)
ans = <dates: 1950Q2>
Method: B = sort(A)


Sort method for dates objects. Returns a dates object with elements sorted by increasing order.

Example

>> dd = dates('1945Q3','1938Q4','1789Q3');
>> dd.sort()
ans = <dates: 1789Q3, 1938Q4, 1945Q3>
Method: B = uminus(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave unary minus operator. Returns a dates object with elements shifted one period backward.

Example

>> dd = dates('1945Q3','1938Q4','1973Q1');
>> -dd
ans = <dates: 1945Q2, 1938Q3, 1972Q4>
Method: D = union(A, B, C, ...)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave union function. Returns a dates object with elements sorted by increasing order (repetitions are removed, to keep the repetitions use the horzcat or plus operators).

Example

>> d1 = dates('1945Q3','1973Q1','1938Q4');
>> d2 = dates('1973Q1','1976Q1');
>> union(d1,d2)
ans = <dates: 1938Q4, 1945Q3, 1973Q1, 1976Q1>
Method: B = unique(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave unique function. Returns a dates object with repetitions removed (only the last occurence of a date is kept).

Example

>> d1 = dates('1945Q3','1973Q1','1945Q3');
>> d1.unique()
ans = <dates: 1973Q1, 1945Q3>
Method: B = uplus(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave unary plus operator. Returns a dates object with elements shifted one period ahead.

Example

>> dd = dates('1945Q3','1938Q4','1973Q1');
>> +dd
ans = <dates: 1945Q4, 1939Q1, 1973Q2>

6.2. The dseries class

Dynare class: dseries


The Matlab/Octave dseries class handles time series data. As any Matlab/Octave statements, this class can be used in a Dynare’s mod file. A dseries object has eight members:

Members:
  • name – A nobs*1 cell of strings or a nobs*p character array, the names of the variables.
  • tex – A nobs*1 cell of strings or a nobs*p character array, the tex names of the variables.
  • dates (dates) – An object with nobs elements, the dates of the sample.
  • data (double) – A nobs by vobs array, the data.

data, name, tex are private members. The following constructors are available:

Constructor: dseries()
Constructor: dseries(INITIAL_DATE)


Instantiates an empty dseries object, with, if defined, an initial date given by the single element dates object INITIAL_DATE.

Constructor: dseries(FILENAME[, INITIAL_DATE])


Instantiates and populates a dseries object with a data file specified by FILENAME, a string passed as input. Valid file types are .m, .mat, .csv and .xls/.xlsx (Octave only supports .xlsx files and the io package from Octave-Forge must be installed). A typical .m file will have the following form:

INIT__ = '1994Q3';
NAMES__ = {'azert';'yuiop'};
TEX__ = {'azert';'yuiop'};

azert = randn(100,1);
yuiop = randn(100,1);

If a .mat file is used instead, it should provide the same informations. Note that the INIT__ variable can be either a dates object or a string which could be used to instantiate the same dates object. If INIT__ is not provided in the .mat or .m file, the initial is by default set equal to dates('1Y'). If a second input argument is passed to the constructor, dates object INITIAL_DATE, the initial date defined in FILENAME is reset to INITIAL_DATE. This is typically usefull if INIT__ is not provided in the data file.

Constructor: dseries(DATA_MATRIX[,INITIAL_DATE[,LIST_OF_NAMES[,TEX_NAMES]]])
Constructor: dseries(DATA_MATRIX[,RANGE_OF_DATES[,LIST_OF_NAMES[,TEX_NAMES]]])


If the data is not read from a file, it can be provided via a \(T \times N\) matrix as the first argument to dseries ’ constructor, with \(T\) representing the number of observations on \(N\) variables. The optional second argument, INITIAL_DATE, can be either a dates object representing the period of the first observation or a string which would be used to instantiate a dates object. Its default value is dates('1Y'). The optional third argument, LIST_OF_NAMES, is a \(N \times 1\) cell of strings with one entry for each variable name. The default name associated with column i of DATA_MATRIX is Variable_i. The final argument, TEX_NAMES, is a \(N \times 1\) cell of strings composed of the LaTeX names associated with the variables. The default LaTeX name associated with column i of DATA_MATRIX is Variable\_i. If the optional second input argument is a range of dates, dates object RANGE_OF_DATES, the number of rows in the first argument must match the number of elements RANGE_OF_DATES or be equal to one (in which case the single observation is replicated).

Example

Various ways to create a dseries object:

do1 = dseries(1999Q3);
do2 = dseries('filename.csv');
do3 = dseries([1; 2; 3], 1999Q3, {'var123'}, {'var_{123}'});

>> do1 = dseries(dates('1999Q3'));
>> do2 = dseries('filename.csv');
>> do3 = dseries([1; 2; 3], dates('1999Q3'), {'var123'}, {'var_{123}'});

One can easily create subsamples from a dseries object using the overloaded parenthesis operator. If ds is a dseries object with \(T\) observations and d is a dates object with \(S<T\) elements, such that \(\min(d)\) is not smaller than the date associated to the first observation in ds and \(\max(d)\) is not greater than the date associated to the last observation, then ds(d) instantiates a new dseries object containing the subsample defined by d.

A list of the available methods, by alphabetical order, is given below.

Method: A = abs(B)


Overloads the abs() function for dseries objects. Returns the absolute value of the variables in dseries object B.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(randn(3,2),'1973Q1',{'A1'; 'A2'},{'A_1'; 'A_2'});
>> ts1 = ts0.abs();
>> ts0

ts0 is a dseries object:

       | A1       | A2
1973Q1 | -0.67284 | 1.4367
1973Q2 | -0.51222 | -0.4948
1973Q3 | 0.99791  | 0.22677

>> ts1

ts1 is a dseries object:

       | abs(A1) | abs(A2)
1973Q1 | 0.67284 | 1.4367
1973Q2 | 0.51222 | 0.4948
1973Q3 | 0.99791 | 0.22677
Method: [A, B] = align(A, B)

If dseries objects A and B are defined on different time ranges, this function extends A and/or B with NaNs so that they are defined on the same time range. Note that both dseries objects must have the same frequency.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(5,1),dates('2000Q1')); % 2000Q1 -> 2001Q1
>> ts1 = dseries(rand(3,1),dates('2000Q4')); % 2000Q4 -> 2001Q2
>> [ts0, ts1] = align(ts0, ts1);             % 2000Q1 -> 2001Q2
>> ts0

ts0 is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
2000Q1 | 0.81472
2000Q2 | 0.90579
2000Q3 | 0.12699
2000Q4 | 0.91338
2001Q1 | 0.63236
2001Q2 | NaN

>> ts1

ts1 is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
2000Q1 | NaN
2000Q2 | NaN
2000Q3 | NaN
2000Q4 | 0.66653
2001Q1 | 0.17813
2001Q2 | 0.12801
Method: B = baxter_king_filter(A, hf, lf, K)


Implementation of the Baxter and King (1999) band pass filter for dseries objects. This filter isolates business cycle fluctuations with a period of length ranging between hf (high frequency) to lf (low frequency) using a symmetric moving average smoother with \(2K+1\) points, so that \(K\) observations at the beginning and at the end of the sample are lost in the computation of the filter. The default value for hf is 6, for lf is 32, and for K is 12.

Example

% Simulate a component model (stochastic trend, deterministic
% trend, and a stationary autoregressive process).
e = 0.2*randn(200,1);
u = randn(200,1);
stochastic_trend = cumsum(e);
deterministic_trend = .1*transpose(1:200);
x = zeros(200,1);
for i=2:200
    x(i) = .75*x(i-1) + e(i);
end
y = x + stochastic_trend + deterministic_trend;

% Instantiates time series objects.
ts0 = dseries(y,'1950Q1');
ts1 = dseries(x,'1950Q1'); % stationary component.

% Apply the Baxter-King filter.
ts2 = ts0.baxter_king_filter();

% Plot the filtered time series.
plot(ts1(ts2.dates).data,'-k'); % Plot of the stationary component.
hold on
plot(ts2.data,'--r');           % Plot of the filtered y.
hold off
axis tight
id = get(gca,'XTick');
set(gca,'XTickLabel',strings(ts1.dates(id)));
Method: C = chain(A, B)


Merge two dseries objects along the time dimension. The two objects must have the same number of observed variables, and the initial date in B must not be posterior to the last date in A. The returned dseries object, C, is built by extending A with the cumulated growth factors of B.

Example

>> ts = dseries([1; 2; 3; 4],dates(`1950Q1'))

ts is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
1950Q1 | 1
1950Q2 | 2
1950Q3 | 3
1950Q4 | 4

>> us = dseries([3; 4; 5; 6],dates(`1950Q3'))

us is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
1950Q3 | 3
1950Q4 | 4
1951Q1 | 5
1951Q2 | 6

>> chain(ts, us)

ans is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
1950Q1 | 1
1950Q2 | 2
1950Q3 | 3
1950Q4 | 4
1951Q1 | 5
1951Q2 | 6
Method: [error_flag, message ] = check(A)


Sanity check of dseries object A. Returns 1 if there is an error, 0 otherwise. The second output argument is a string giving brief informations about the error.

Method: B = cumprod(A[, d[, v]])


Overloads the Matlab/Octave cumprod function for dseries objects. The cumulated product cannot be computed if the variables in dseries object A have NaNs. If a dates object d is provided as a second argument, then the method computes the cumulated product with the additional constraint that the variables in the dseries object B are equal to one in period d. If a single-observation dseries object v is provided as a third argument, the cumulated product in B is normalized such that B(d) matches v (dseries objects A and v must have the same number of variables).

Example

>> ts1 = dseries(2*ones(7,1));
>> ts2 = ts1.cumprod();
>> ts2

ts2 is a dseries object:

   | cumprod(Variable_1)
1Y | 2
2Y | 4
3Y | 8
4Y | 16
5Y | 32
6Y | 64
7Y | 128

>> ts3 = ts1.cumsum(dates('3Y'));
>> ts3

ts3 is a dseries object:

   | cumprod(Variable_1)
1Y | 0.25
2Y | 0.5
3Y | 1
4Y | 2
5Y | 4
6Y | 8
7Y | 16

>> ts4 = ts1.cumsum(dates('3Y'),dseries(pi));
>> ts4

ts4 is a dseries object:

   | cumprod(Variable_1)
1Y | 0.7854
2Y | 1.5708
3Y | 3.1416
4Y | 6.2832
5Y | 12.5664
6Y | 25.1327
7Y | 50.2655
Method: B = cumsum(A[, d[, v]])


Overloads the Matlab/Octave cumsum function for dseries objects. The cumulated sum cannot be computed if the variables in dseries object A have NaNs. If a dates object d is provided as a second argument, then the method computes the cumulated sum with the additional constraint that the variables in the dseries object B are zero in period d. If a single observation dseries object v is provided as a third argument, the cumulated sum in B is such that B(d) matches v (dseries objects A and v must have the same number of variables).

Example

>> ts1 = dseries(ones(10,1));
>> ts2 = ts1.cumsum();
>> ts2

ts2 is a dseries object:

    | cumsum(Variable_1)
1Y  | 1
2Y  | 2
3Y  | 3
4Y  | 4
5Y  | 5
6Y  | 6
7Y  | 7
8Y  | 8
9Y  | 9
10Y | 10

>> ts3 = ts1.cumsum(dates('3Y'));
>> ts3

ts3 is a dseries object:

    | cumsum(Variable_1)
1Y  | -2
2Y  | -1
3Y  | 0
4Y  | 1
5Y  | 2
6Y  | 3
7Y  | 4
8Y  | 5
9Y  | 6
10Y | 7

>> ts4 = ts1.cumsum(dates('3Y'),dseries(pi));
>> ts4

ts4 is a dseries object:

    | cumsum(Variable_1)
1Y  | 1.1416
2Y  | 2.1416
3Y  | 3.1416
4Y  | 4.1416
5Y  | 5.1416
6Y  | 6.1416
7Y  | 7.1416
8Y  | 8.1416
9Y  | 9.1416
10Y | 10.1416
Method: C = eq(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave eq (equal, ==) operator. dseries objects A and B must have the same number of observations (say, \(T\)) and variables (\(N\)). The returned argument is a \(T \times N\) matrix of zeros and ones. Element \((i,j)\) of C is equal to 1 if and only if observation \(i\) for variable \(j\) in A and B are the same.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(2*ones(3,1));
>> ts1 = dseries([2; 0; 2]);
>> ts0==ts1

ans =

     1
     0
     1
Method: B = exp(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave exp function for dseries objects.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(10,1));
>> ts1 = ts0.exp();
Method: l = exist(A, varname)


Tests if variable exists in dseries object A. Returns 1 (true) iff variable exists in A.

Example

>> ts = dseries(randn(100,1));
>> ts.exist('Variable_1')

ans =

     1

>> ts.exist('Variable_2')

ans =

     0
Method: C = extract(A, B[, ...])


Extracts some variables from a dseries object A and returns a dseries object C. The input arguments following A are strings representing the variables to be selected in the new dseries object C. To simplify the creation of sub-objects, the dseries class overloads the curly braces (D = extract (A, B, C) is equivalent to D = A{B,C}) and allows implicit loops (defined between a pair of @ symbol, see examples below) or Matlab/Octave’s regular expressions (introduced by square brackets).

Example

The following selections are equivalent:

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(100,10));
>> ts1 = ts0{'Variable_1','Variable_2','Variable_3'};
>> ts2 = ts0{'Variable_@1,2,3@'}
>> ts3 = ts0{'Variable_[1-3]$'}
>> isequal(ts1,ts2) && isequal(ts1,ts3)

ans =

     1

It is possible to use up to two implicit loops to select variables:

names = {'GDP_1';'GDP_2';'GDP_3'; 'GDP_4'; 'GDP_5'; 'GDP_6'; 'GDP_7'; 'GDP_8'; ...
    'GDP_9'; 'GDP_10'; 'GDP_11'; 'GDP_12'; ...
    'HICP_1';'HICP_2';'HICP_3'; 'HICP_4'; 'HICP_5'; 'HICP_6'; 'HICP_7'; 'HICP_8'; ...
    'HICP_9'; 'HICP_10'; 'HICP_11'; 'HICP_12'};

ts0 = dseries(randn(4,24),dates('1973Q1'),names);
ts0{'@GDP,HICP@_@1,3,5@'}

ans is a dseries object:

       | GDP_1    | GDP_3     | GDP_5     | HICP_1   | HICP_3   | HICP_5
1973Q1 | 1.7906   | -1.6606   | -0.57716  | 0.60963  | -0.52335 | 0.26172
1973Q2 | 2.1624   | 3.0125    | 0.52563   | 0.70912  | -1.7158  | 1.7792
1973Q3 | -0.81928 | 1.5008    | 1.152     | 0.2798   | 0.88568  | 1.8927
1973Q4 | -0.03705 | -0.35899  | 0.85838   | -1.4675  | -2.1666  | -0.62032
Method: f = freq(B)


Returns the frequency of the variables in dseries object B.

Example

>> ts = dseries(randn(3,2),'1973Q1');
>> ts.freq

ans =

     4
Method: D = horzcat(A, B[, ...])


Overloads the horzcat Matlab/Octave’s method for dseries objects. Returns a dseries object D containing the variables in dseries objects passed as inputs: A, B, ... If the inputs are not defined on the same time ranges, the method adds NaNs to the variables so that the variables are redefined on the smallest common time range. Note that the names in the dseries objects passed as inputs must be different and these objects must have common frequency.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(5,2),'1950Q1',{'nifnif';'noufnouf'});
>> ts1 = dseries(rand(7,1),'1950Q3',{'nafnaf'});
>> ts2 = [ts0, ts1];
>> ts2

ts2 is a dseries object:

       | nifnif  | noufnouf | nafnaf
1950Q1 | 0.17404 | 0.71431  | NaN
1950Q2 | 0.62741 | 0.90704  | NaN
1950Q3 | 0.84189 | 0.21854  | 0.83666
1950Q4 | 0.51008 | 0.87096  | 0.8593
1951Q1 | 0.16576 | 0.21184  | 0.52338
1951Q2 | NaN     | NaN      | 0.47736
1951Q3 | NaN     | NaN      | 0.88988
1951Q4 | NaN     | NaN      | 0.065076
1952Q1 | NaN     | NaN      | 0.50946
Method: B = hpcycle(A[, lambda])


Extracts the cycle component from a dseries A object using the Hodrick and Prescott (1997) filter and returns a dseries object, B. The default value for lambda, the smoothing parameter, is 1600.

Example

% Simulate a component model (stochastic trend, deterministic
% trend, and a stationary autoregressive process).
e = 0.2*randn(200,1);
u = randn(200,1);
stochastic_trend = cumsum(e);
deterministic_trend = .1*transpose(1:200);
x = zeros(200,1);
for i=2:200
    x(i) = .75*x(i-1) + e(i);
end
y = x + stochastic_trend + deterministic_trend;

% Instantiates time series objects.
ts0 = dseries(y,'1950Q1');
ts1 = dseries(x,'1950Q1'); % stationary component.

% Apply the HP filter.
ts2 = ts0.hpcycle();

% Plot the filtered time series.
plot(ts1(ts2.dates).data,'-k'); % Plot of the stationary component.
hold on
plot(ts2.data,'--r');           % Plot of the filtered y.
hold off
axis tight
id = get(gca,'XTick');
set(gca,'XTickLabel',strings(ts.dates(id)));
Method: B = hptrend(A[, lambda])


Extracts the trend component from a dseries A object using the Hodrick and Prescott (1997) filter and returns a dseries object, B. Default value for lambda, the smoothing parameter, is 1600.

Example

% Using the same generating data process
% as in the previous example:

ts1 = dseries(stochastic_trend + deterministic_trend,'1950Q1');
% Apply the HP filter.
ts2 = ts0.hptrend();

% Plot the filtered time series.
plot(ts1.data,'-k'); % Plot of the nonstationary components.
hold on
plot(ts2.data,'--r');  % Plot of the estimated trend.
hold off
axis tight
id = get(gca,'XTick');
set(gca,'XTickLabel',strings(ts0.dates(id)));
Method: f = init(B)


Returns the initial date in dseries object B.

Example

>> ts = dseries(randn(3,2),'1973Q1');
>> ts.init
ans = <dates: 1973Q1>
Method: C = insert(A, B, I)


Inserts variables contained in dseries object B in dseries object A at positions specified by integer scalars in vector I, returns augmented dseries object C. The integer scalars in I must take values between `` and A.length()+1 and refers to A ’s column numbers. The dseries objects A and B need not be defined over the same time ranges, but it is assumed that they have common frequency.

Example:
>> ts0 = dseries(ones(2,4),'1950Q1',{'Sly'; 'Gobbo'; 'Sneaky'; 'Stealthy'});
>> ts1 = dseries(pi*ones(2,1),'1950Q1',{'Noddy'});
>> ts2 = ts0.insert(ts1,3)

ts2 is a dseries object:

       | Sly | Gobbo | Noddy  | Sneaky | Stealthy
1950Q1 | 1   | 1     | 3.1416 | 1      | 1
1950Q2 | 1   | 1     | 3.1416 | 1      | 1

>> ts3 = dseries([pi*ones(2,1) sqrt(pi)*ones(2,1)],'1950Q1',{'Noddy';'Tessie Bear'});
>> ts4 = ts0.insert(ts1,[3, 4])

ts4 is a dseries object:

       | Sly | Gobbo | Noddy  | Sneaky | Tessie Bear | Stealthy
1950Q1 | 1   | 1     | 3.1416 | 1      | 1.7725      | 1
1950Q2 | 1   | 1     | 3.1416 | 1      | 1.7725      | 1
Method: B = isempty(A)


Overloads the Matlab/octave’s isempty function. Returns 1 if dseries object A is empty, 0 otherwise.

Method: C = isequal(A,B)


Overloads the Matlab/octave’s isequal function. Returns 1 if dseries objects A and B are identical, 0 otherwise.

Method: B = lag(A[, p])

Returns lagged time series. Default value of p, the number of lags, is 1.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(transpose(1:4),'1950Q1')

ts0 is a dseries object:

       | Variable_1
1950Q1 | 1
1950Q2 | 2
1950Q3 | 3
1950Q4 | 4

>> ts1 = ts0.lag()

ts1 is a dseries object:

           | lag(Variable_1,1)
    1950Q1 | NaN
    1950Q2 | 1
    1950Q3 | 2
    1950Q4 | 3

>> ts2 = ts0.lag(2)

ts2 is a dseries object:

       | lag(Variable_1,2)
1950Q1 | NaN
1950Q2 | NaN
1950Q3 | 1
1950Q4 | 2

% dseries class overloads the parenthesis
% so that ts.lag(p) can be written more
% compactly as ts(-p). For instance:

>> ts0.lag(1)

ans is a dseries object:

       | lag(Variable_1,1)
1950Q1 | NaN
1950Q2 | 1
1950Q3 | 2
1950Q4 | 3

or alternatively:

>> ts0(-1)

ans is a dseries object:

       | lag(Variable_1,1)
1950Q1 | NaN
1950Q2 | 1
1950Q3 | 2
1950Q4 | 3
Method: l = last(B)


Returns the last date in dseries object B.

Example

>> ts = dseries(randn(3,2),'1973Q1');
>> ts.last
ans = <dates: 1973Q3>
Method: B = lead(A[, p])


Returns lead time series. Default value of p, the number of leads, is 1. As in the lag method, the dseries class overloads the parenthesis so that ts.lead(p) is equivalent to ts(p).

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(transpose(1:4),'1950Q1');
>> ts1 = ts0.lead()

ts1 is a dseries object:

       | lead(Variable_1,1)
1950Q1 | 2
1950Q2 | 3
1950Q3 | 4
1950Q4 | NaN

>> ts2 = ts0(2)

ts2 is a dseries object:

       | lead(Variable_1,2)
1950Q1 | 3
1950Q2 | 4
1950Q3 | NaN
1950Q4 | NaN

Remark

The overloading of the parenthesis for dseries objects, allows to easily create new dseries objects by copying/pasting equations declared in the model block. For instance, if an Euler equation is defined in the model block:

model;
...
1/C - beta/C(1)*(exp(A(1))*K^(alpha-1)+1-delta) ;
...
end;

and if variables , ``A and K are defined as dseries objects, then by writing:

Residuals = 1/C - beta/C(1)*(exp(A(1))*K^(alpha-1)+1-delta) ;

outside of the model block, we create a new dseries object, called Residuals, for the residuals of the Euler equation (the conditional expectation of the equation defined in the model block is zero, but the residuals are non zero).

Method: B = log(A)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave log function for dseries objects.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(10,1));
>> ts1 = ts0.log();
Method: C = merge(A, B)


Merges two dseries objects A and B in dseries object C. Objects A and B need to have common frequency but can be defined on different time ranges. If a variable, say x, is defined both in dseries objects A and B, then the merge will select the variable x as defined in the second input argument, B.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(3,2),'1950Q1',{'A1';'A2'})

ts0 is a dseries object:

       | A1       | A2
1950Q1 | 0.42448  | 0.92477
1950Q2 | 0.60726  | 0.64208
1950Q3 | 0.070764 | 0.1045

>> ts1 = dseries(rand(3,1),'1950Q2',{'A1'})

ts1 is a dseries object:

       | A1
1950Q2 | 0.70023
1950Q3 | 0.3958
1950Q4 | 0.084905

>> merge(ts0,ts1)

ans is a dseries object:

       | A1       | A2
1950Q1 | NaN      | 0.92477
1950Q2 | 0.70023  | 0.64208
1950Q3 | 0.3958   | 0.1045
1950Q4 | 0.084905 | NaN

>> merge(ts1,ts0)

ans is a dseries object:

       | A1       | A2
1950Q1 | 0.42448  | 0.92477
1950Q2 | 0.60726  | 0.64208
1950Q3 | 0.070764 | 0.1045
1950Q4 | NaN      | NaN
Method: C = minus(A, B)


Overloads the minus (-) operator for dseries objects, element by element subtraction. If both A and B are dseries objects, they do not need to be defined over the same time ranges. If A and B are dseries objects with \(T_A\) and \(T_B\) observations and \(N_A\) and \(N_B\) variables, then \(N_A\) must be equal to \(N_B\) or \(1\) and \(N_B\) must be equal to \(N_A\) or \(1\). If \(T_A=T_B\), isequal(A.init,B.init) returns 1 and \(N_A=N_B\), then the minus operator will compute for each couple \((t,n)\), with \(1\le t\le T_A\) and \(1\le n\le N_A\), C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)-B.data(t,n). If \(N_B\) is equal to \(1\) and \(N_A>1\), the smaller dseries object (B) is “broadcast” across the larger dseries (A) so that they have compatible shapes, the minus operator will subtract the variable defined in B from each variable in A. If B is a double scalar, then the method minus will subtract B from all the observations/variables in A. If B is a row vector of length \(N_A\), then the minus method will subtract B(i) from all the observations of variable i, for \(i=1,...,N_A\). If B is a column vector of length \(T_A\), then the minus method will subtract B from all the variables.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(3,2));
>> ts1 = ts0{'Variable_2'};
>> ts0-ts1

ans is a dseries object:

   | minus(Variable_1,Variable_2) | minus(Variable_2,Variable_2)
1Y | -0.48853                     | 0
2Y | -0.50535                     | 0
3Y | -0.32063                     | 0

>> ts1

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Variable_2
1Y | 0.703
2Y | 0.75415
3Y | 0.54729

>> ts1-ts1.data(1)

ans is a dseries object:

   | minus(Variable_2,0.703)
1Y | 0
2Y | 0.051148
3Y | -0.15572

>> ts1.data(1)-ts1

ans is a dseries object:

   | minus(0.703,Variable_2)
1Y | 0
2Y | -0.051148
3Y | 0.15572
Method: C = mpower(A, B)


Overloads the mpower (^) operator for dseries objects and computes element-by-element power. A is a dseries object with N variables and T observations. If B is a real scalar, then mpower(A,B) returns a dseries object C with C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)^C. If B is a dseries object with N variables and T observations then mpower(A,B) returns a dseries object C with C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)^C.data(t,n).

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(transpose(1:3));
>> ts1 = ts0^2

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | power(Variable_1,2)
1Y | 1
2Y | 4
3Y | 9

>> ts2 = ts0^ts0

ts2 is a dseries object:

   | power(Variable_1,Variable_1)
1Y | 1
2Y | 4
3Y | 27
Method: C = mrdivide(A, B)


Overloads the mrdivide (/) operator for dseries objects, element by element division (like the ./ Matlab/Octave operator). If both A and B are dseries objects, they do not need to be defined over the same time ranges. If A and B are dseries objects with \(T_A\) and \(T_B\) observations and \(N_A\) and \(N_B\) variables, then \(N_A\) must be equal to \(N_B\) or \(1\) and \(N_B\) must be equal to \(N_A\) or \(1\). If \(T_A=T_B\), isequal(A.init,B.init) returns 1 and \(N_A=N_B\), then the mrdivide operator will compute for each couple \((t,n)\), with \(1\le t\le T_A\) and \(1\le n\le N_A\), C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)/B.data(t,n). If \(N_B\) is equal to \(1\) and \(N_A>1\), the smaller dseries object (B) is “broadcast” across the larger dseries (A) so that they have compatible shapes. In this case the mrdivide operator will divide each variable defined in A by the variable in B, observation per observation. If B is a double scalar, then mrdivide will divide all the observations/variables in A by B. If B is a row vector of length \(N_A\), then mrdivide will divide all the observations of variable i by B(i), for \(i=1,...,N_A\). If B is a column vector of length \(T_A\), then mrdivide will perform a division of all the variables by B, element by element.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(3,2))

ts0 is a dseries object:

   | Variable_1 | Variable_2
1Y | 0.72918    | 0.90307
2Y | 0.93756    | 0.21819
3Y | 0.51725    | 0.87322

>> ts1 = ts0{'Variable_2'};
>> ts0/ts1

ans is a dseries object:

   | divide(Variable_1,Variable_2) | divide(Variable_2,Variable_2)
1Y | 0.80745                       | 1
2Y | 4.2969                        | 1
3Y | 0.59235                       | 1
Method: C = mtimes(A, B)


Overloads the mtimes (*) operator for dseries objects and the Hadammard product (the .* Matlab/Octave operator). If both A and B are dseries objects, they do not need to be defined over the same time ranges. If A and B are dseries objects with \(T_A\) and \(_B\) observations and \(N_A\) and \(N_B\) variables, then \(N_A\) must be equal to \(N_B\) or \(1\) and \(N_B\) must be equal to \(N_A\) or \(1\). If \(T_A=T_B\), isequal(A.init,B.init) returns 1 and \(N_A=N_B\), then the mtimes operator will compute for each couple \((t,n)\), with \(1\le t\le T_A\) and \(1\le n\le N_A\), C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)*B.data(t,n). If \(N_B\) is equal to \(1\) and \(N_A>1\), the smaller dseries object (B) is “broadcast” across the larger dseries (A) so that they have compatible shapes, mtimes operator will multiply each variable defined in A by the variable in B, observation per observation. If B is a double scalar, then the method mtimes will multiply all the observations/variables in A by B. If B is a row vector of length \(N_A\), then the mtimes method will multiply all the observations of variable i by B(i), for \(i=1,...,N_A\). If B is a column vector of length \(T_A\), then the mtimes method will perform a multiplication of all the variables by B, element by element.

Method: C = ne(A, B)


Overloads the Matlab/Octave ne (not equal, ~=) operator. dseries objects A and B must have the same number of observations (say, \(T\)) and variables (\(N\)). The returned argument is a \(T\) by \(N\) matrix of zeros and ones. Element \((i,j)\) of C is equal to 1 if and only if observation \(i\) for variable \(j\) in A and B are not equal.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(2*ones(3,1));
>> ts1 = dseries([2; 0; 2]);
>> ts0~=ts1

ans =

     0
     1
     0
Method: B = nobs(A)


Returns the number of observations in dseries object A.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(randn(10));
>> ts0.nobs

ans =

    10
Method: h = plot(A)
Method: h = plot(A, B)
Method: h = plot(A[, ...])
Method: h = plot(A, B[, ...])


Overloads Matlab/Octave’s plot function for dseries objects. Returns a Matlab/Octave plot handle, that can be used to modify the properties of the plotted time series. If only one dseries object, A, is passed as argument, then the plot function will put the associated dates on the x-abscissa. If this dseries object contains only one variable, additional arguments can be passed to modify the properties of the plot (as one would do with the Matlab/Octave’s version of the plot function). If dseries object A contains more than one variable, it is not possible to pass these additional arguments and the properties of the plotted time series must be modified using the returned plot handle and the Matlab/Octave set function (see example below). If two dseries objects, A and B, are passed as input arguments, the plot function will plot the variables in A against the variables in B (the number of variables in each object must be the same otherwise an error is issued). Again, if each object contains only one variable, additional arguments can be passed to modify the properties of the plotted time series, otherwise the Matlab/Octave set command has to be used.

Example

Define a dseries object with two variables (named by default Variable_1 and Variable_2):

>> ts = dseries(randn(100,2),'1950Q1');

The following command will plot the first variable in ts:

>> plot(ts{'Variable_1'},'-k','linewidth',2);

The next command will draw all the variables in ts on the same figure:

>> h = plot(ts);

If one wants to modify the properties of the plotted time series (line style, colours, …), the set function can be used (see Matlab’s documentation):

>> set(h(1),'-k','linewidth',2);
>> set(h(2),'--r');

The following command will plot Variable_1 against exp(Variable_1):

>> plot(ts{'Variable_1'},ts{'Variable_1'}.exp(),'ok');

Again, the properties can also be modified using the returned plot handle and the set function:

>> h = plot(ts, ts.exp());
>> set(h(1),'ok');
>> set(h(2),'+r');
Method: C = plus(A, B)


Overloads the plus (+) operator for dseries objects, element by element addition. If both A and B are dseries objects, they do not need to be defined over the same time ranges. If A and B are dseries objects with \(T_A\) and \(T_B\) observations and \(N_A\) and \(N_B\) variables, then \(N_A\) must be equal to \(N_B\) or \(1\) and \(N_B\) must be equal to \(N_A\) or \(1\). If \(T_A=T_B\), isequal(A.init,B.init) returns 1 and \(N_A=N_B\), then the plus operator will compute for each couple \((t,n)\), with \(1\le t\le T_A\) and \(1\le n\le N_A\), C.data(t,n)=A.data(t,n)+B.data(t,n). If \(N_B\) is equal to \(1\) and \(N_A>1\), the smaller dseries object (B) is “broadcast” across the larger dseries (A) so that they have compatible shapes, the plus operator will add the variable defined in B to each variable in A. If B is a double scalar, then the method plus will add B to all the observations/variables in A. If B is a row vector of length \(N_A\), then the plus method will add B(i) to all the observations of variable i, for \(i=1,...,N_A\). If B is a column vector of length \(T_A\), then the plus method will add B to all the variables.

Method: C = pop(A[, B])


Removes variable B from dseries object A. By default, if the second argument is not provided, the last variable is removed.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(3,3));
>> ts1 = ts0.pop('Variable_2');

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Variable_1 | Variable_3
1Y | 1          | 1
2Y | 1          | 1
3Y | 1          | 1
Method: B = qdiff(A)
Method: B = qgrowth(A)


Computes quarterly differences or growth rates.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(transpose(1:4),'1950Q1');
>> ts1 = ts0.qdiff()

ts1 is a dseries object:

       | qdiff(Variable_1)
1950Q1 | NaN
1950Q2 | 1
1950Q3 | 1
1950Q4 | 1

>> ts0 = dseries(transpose(1:6),'1950M1');
>> ts1 = ts0.qdiff()

ts1 is a dseries object:

        | qdiff(Variable_1)
1950M1  | NaN
1950M2  | NaN
1950M3  | NaN
1950M4  | 3
1950M5  | 3
1950M6  | 3
Method: C = remove(A, B)


Alias for the pop method with two arguments. Removes variable B from dseries object A.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(3,3));
>> ts1 = ts0.remove('Variable_2');

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Variable_1 | Variable_3
1Y | 1          | 1
2Y | 1          | 1
3Y | 1          | 1

A shorter syntax is available: remove(ts,'Variable_2') is equivalent to ts{'Variable_2'} = [] ([] can be replaced by any empty object). This alternative syntax is useful if more than one variable has to be removed. For instance:

ts{'Variable_@2,3,4@'} = [];

will remove Variable_2, Variable_3 and Variable_4 from dseries object ts (if these variables exist). Regular expressions cannot be used but implicit loops can.

Method: B = rename(A,oldname,newname)


Rename variable oldname to newname in dseries object A. Returns a dseries object.``

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(2,2));
>> ts1 = ts0.rename('Variable_1','Stinkly')

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Stinkly | Variable_2
1Y | 1       | 1
2Y | 1       | 1
Method: C = rename(A,newname)


Replace the names in A with those passed in the cell string array newname. newname must have the same number of cells as A has dseries. Returns a dseries object.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(2,3));
>> ts1 = ts0.rename({'Tree','Worst','President'})

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Bush | Worst | President
1Y | 1    | 1     | 1
2Y | 1    | 1     | 1
Method: save(A, basename[, format])


Overloads the Matlab/Octave save function and saves dseries object A to disk. Possible formats are csv (this is the default), m (Matlab/Octave script), and mat (Matlab binary data file). The name of the file without extension is specified by basename.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(2,2));
>> ts0.save('ts0');

The last command will create a file ts0.csv with the following content:

,Variable_1,Variable_2
1Y,               1,               1
2Y,               1,               1

To create a Matlab/Octave script, the following command:

>> ts0.save('ts0','m');

will produce a file ts0.m with the following content:

% File created on 14-Nov-2013 12:08:52.

FREQ__ = 1;
INIT__ = ' 1Y';

NAMES__ = {'Variable_1'; 'Variable_2'};
TEX__ = {'Variable_{1}'; 'Variable_{2}'};

Variable_1 = [
              1
              1];

Variable_2 = [
              1
              1];

The generated (csv, m, or mat) files can be loaded when instantiating a dseries object as explained above.

Method: B = set_names(A, s1, s2, ...)


Renames variables in dseries object A and returns a dseries object B with new names s1, s2, … The number of input arguments after the first one (dseries object A) must be equal to A.vobs (the number of variables in A). s1 will be the name of the first variable in B, s2 the name of the second variable in B, and so on.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(1,3));
>> ts1 = ts0.set_names('Barbibul',[],'Barbouille')

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | Barbibul | Variable_2 | Barbouille
1Y | 1        | 1          | 1
Method: [T, N ] = size(A[, dim])

Overloads the Matlab/Octave’s size function. Returns the number of observations in dseries object A (i.e. A.nobs) and the number of variables (i.e. A.vobs). If a second input argument is passed, the size function returns the number of observations if dim=1 or the number of variables if dim=2 (for all other values of dim an error is issued).

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(ones(1,3));
>> ts0.size()

ans =

     1     3
Method: B = tex_rename(A, name, newtexname)
Method: B = tex_rename(A, newtexname)


Redefines the tex name of variable name to newtexname in dseries object A. Returns a dseries object.

With only two arguments A and newtexname, it redefines the tex names of the A to those contained in newtexname. Here, newtexname is a cell string array with the same number of entries as variables in A.

Method: B = uminus(A)


Overloads uminus (-, unary minus) for dseries object.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(1)

ts0 is a dseries object:

   | Variable_1
1Y | 1

>> ts1 = -ts0

ts1 is a dseries object:

   | -Variable_1
1Y | -1
Method: D = vertcat(A, B[, ...])


Overloads the vertcat Matlab/Octave method for dseries objects. This method is used to append more observations to a dseries object. Returns a dseries object D containing the variables in dseries objects passed as inputs. All the input arguments must be dseries objects with the same variables defined on different time ranges.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(rand(2,2),'1950Q1',{'nifnif';'noufnouf'});
>> ts1 = dseries(rand(2,2),'1950Q3',{'nifnif';'noufnouf'});
>> ts2 = [ts0; ts1]

ts2 is a dseries object:

       | nifnif   | noufnouf
1950Q1 | 0.82558  | 0.31852
1950Q2 | 0.78996  | 0.53406
1950Q3 | 0.089951 | 0.13629
1950Q4 | 0.11171  | 0.67865
Method: B = vobs(A)


Returns the number of variables in dseries object A.

Example

>> ts0 = dseries(randn(10,2));
>> ts0.vobs

ans =

    2
Method: B = ydiff(A)
Method: B = ygrowth(A)


Computes yearly differences or growth rates.